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EU countries get more latitude on the cultivation of GMOs
Galletti: “The green light to the directive is a very significant step towards the full sovereignty of member states to allow, or not, cultivation of GMOs on their territories".

CC Flickr - Kevin Lallier

EU member states will be allowed to ban or restrict the cultivation of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) on their territory. This is the main purpose of a draft directive approved by the Council's Permanent Representatives Committee on 10 December.

“The green light to the directive is a very significant step towards a long-awaited goal: the full sovereignty of member states to allow, or not, cultivation of GMOs on their territories. The fruitful cooperation of the Italian presidency with the European Parliament and the Commission has led to a coherent and fair text that provides a sound legal basis ensuring member states' freedom of choice on GMOs. This is the approach we always promoted, in the best interest of agricultural producers and citizens. We are proud that this result, crucial for Europe, materializes under the Italian presidency”, says Italian Minister of the Environment Gian Luca Galletti, President of the Council.

The draft directive reflects an agreement reached between the Italian presidency and representatives of the European Parliament and the European Commission on 3 December. It still needs to be formally approved by the Council and the Parliament. If the text is confirmed by the Parliament and the Council early next year the new regime is expected to enter into force in spring 2015. 


For more information: Council of the EU

Last update: 11 December 2014